A stunning 18th-century building – Newark Town Hall

Newark is an ancient market town in Nottinghamshire and taking pride of place in the town’s centre is the Georgian Town Hall, built by John Carr (1723 – 1807) in 1774, using pale grey Mansfield stone.

John Carr by Sir William Beechey
John Carr by Sir William Beechey

Carr gained notoriety for his work on the Crescent at Buxton, Derbyshire and of course the beautiful Harewood House amongst many other Georgian buildings.

The Crescent, Buxton, Derbyshire by John Rubens Smith
The Crescent, Buxton, Derbyshire by John Rubens Smith; Buxton Museum & Art Gallery

This weekend Newark is one of many places across the country taking part in the Heritage Open Days, from 13th, 14th and 15th September 2018. So, if you manage to arrange to visit it’s well worth it.

The view from Newark Town Hall's balcony. © Joanne Major
The view from Newark Town Hall’s balcony. © Joanne Major

On Friday and Saturday, guides will greet visitors in the Market Place before giving them a tour of the beautiful building with its restored ballroom.

Newark Town Hall's ballroom. © Sarah Murden
Newark Town Hall’s ballroom. © Sarah Murden

The building is still a working Town Hall and the tour will also include the Mayor’s Parlour which we’ve already had the privilege of seeing.

Newark Town Hall's ballroom ceiling. © Sarah Murden
Newark Town Hall’s ballroom ceiling. © Sarah Murden

On the ground floor are the old butter market and the town’s prison cells.

The old Buttermarket, Newark. © Sarah Murden
The old Buttermarket, Newark. © Sarah Murden

The Town Hall houses a museum and is also a fun place for children for children as they can try on ceremonial robes or an elegant Georgian dress.

Discover more by clicking here.

2 thoughts on “A stunning 18th-century building – Newark Town Hall

    1. Sarah Murden

      It’s a lovely town with so much history covering so many periods, the Town Hall is definitely worth a visit, especially this weekend. We visited the Town Hall a few weeks and loved it 🙂

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.